Why I am doing the Orange County Heart Walk

I recently sent out an email to friends and family members and thought I should share it with the people who frequent my site as well!


My friends and family members,
If you known me for more than three years, you know about my struggle with obesity. If I were to combine all the weight I’ve lost and gained over the past 11 years, you’d know I have put my health at grave risk. While I have completed my weight loss goal, losing over 140+ lbs as the picture below shows, I know that the real struggle is keeping the weight off. As someone eloquently put it, “It’s not a diet, it’s a lifestyle.” That is why I’m doing the Orange County Heart Walk.
I am taking the pledge to live a healthier life for my heart, and so should you. Whether it’s through a monetary donation or joining our team. What is the correlation between Obesity and Heart disease? I’m glad you asked…

“Until recently the relation between obesity and coronary heart disease was viewed as indirect, ie, through covariates related to both obesity and coronary heart disease risk,12 including hypertension; dyslipidemia, particularly reductions in HDL cholesterol; and impaired glucose tolerance or non–insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Insulin resistance and accompanying hyperinsulinemia are typically associated with these comorbidities.13 Although most of the comorbidities relating obesity to coronary artery disease increase as BMI increases, they also relate to body fat distribution. Long-term longitudinal studies, however, indicate that obesity as such not only relates to but independently predicts coronary atherosclerosis.9 14 15 This relation appears to exist for both men and women with minimal increases in BMI. In a 14-year prospective study, middle-aged women with a BMI >23 but <25 had a 50% increase in risk of nonfatal or fatal coronary heart disease,9 and men aged 40 to 65 years with a BMI >25 but <29 had a 72% increased risk.16 ” – Source: https://circ.ahajournals.org/content/96/9/3248.full

 The stark reality is that my life expectancy has been reduced for my poor eating habits, that is not me being overly dramatic, it is a simple fact. The only way to live is to appreciate each day and give thanks by taking care of my body and loved ones, encouraging them to do the same.

140-pounds-lost

This is not the only cause I intend to bring awareness to. My friends and I have also started an Ontario MS-Walk team, supported crowdfunding campaigns for victims of the Colby Fire, people who are trying to get a decent education, advocated for animal rights, and much more. We call ourselves The Angry Philanthropists .
If you want to support our future Philanthropic efforts, you can donate monthly to our patreon page.
You won’t get another one of these emails, you’re not in some database. I hand picked you because, well, I’ve met you at some point in the past few years and you were memorable!
Love always,
H. Cyrus Kia
Vlogger/Blogger for The Angry Philanthropists

Abysmal Statistics on keeping the weight off

I received a comment today on one of my YouTube videos, which said the following…

“Sadly it’s not true that the slower you go, the more likely you are to keep it off. The statistics for long term maintenance are pretty abysmal, regardless of the rate of loss, or the method of loss. No matter how fast a person loses, all of us are fighting the same battle to maintain that loss.”

Lets put aside the fact that the commenter stated no statistics, and basically insinuated that crash dieting is as effective as gradual weight loss. He is partially right. The odds of us keeping off our way are abysmal.

Nearly 65 percent of dieters return to their pre-dieting weight within three years, according to Gary Foster, Ph.D., clinical director of the Weight and Eating Disorders Program at the University of Pennsylvania. The statistics for dieters who lose weight rapidly, according to Wellsphere, a website sponsored by Stanford University, is worse. Only 5 percent of people who lose weight on a crash diet will keep the weight off.

If you want a quick reason on the physiological effects of crash dieting, click here.

My YouTube vlog simply stated that if you are obese there are probably behavioral problems you need to deal with. I found Cognitive behavioral therapy gave me a healthy way to lose the weight in a realistic time frame. It certainly didn’t feel like a diet, I felt like I was changing my life for the better.

Cleanse was pretty much a failure, here’s my update

 

For those of you who don’t know, I started a cleanse not too long ago – trying to abstain mainly from diet soda and alcohol (the former permanently). While I have successfully stayed away from alcohol, I am having trouble kicking the diet soda habit. Something I consider far more dangerous.

It hasn’t totally been a loss, however, my overall diet has improved. Almost no dairy has been consumed, sugar intake is way down as I have been avoiding sweets and most fruits. I am consuming less diet soda, but I consider that a failure.

Workouts have pretty much gone back to normal. In two weeks I intend to do a hydrostatic weigh in to check how my body fat has held up since the surgery. Not worried too much about this since my workouts will include quite a bit of jogging to train for the OC Heart Walk (donate to my team). Speaking of which, here’s my routine…

Day 1 – Chest, 20 minutes of HIIT on the treadmill

Day 2 – Back, 20 minutes of HIIT on the treadmill

Day 3 – Legs, 30 minutes of power walking on the treadmill on an inclince

Day 4 – Shoulders 20 minutes of HIIT on the treadmill

Day 5 – Arms 20 minutes of HIIT on the treadmill

Day 6 – Calisthenics (burpees and such)

Day 7 – Rest/Foam roller lovin…

Tomorrow I’ll post in detail what each day entails, but It’s a pretty simple routine involving compound a lot of movements on the first three days.

You guys should also know i’m going to be running a sweepstakes through my philanthropy blog/project. The prize is an Ipad Mini.

Take care,

Cyrus

 

I love fitfam

Sometimes I need a quickie. No, not that type of quickie perverts! I need a quick mental pick me up to get my butt off the computer chair and into the gym. For this I turn to one hashtag (#fitfam) on two different social networks (Twitter/Instagram).

For this reason I took a moment to screenshot a few of my favorites just from today. I’ll eventually a list of my all time favorite fitness tweets! Some of these are inspirational and some are just downright funny.
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Follow me on Twitter/Instagram: @Hckia

(if you’re on this list and would like your Tweet removed, please, PM me on Twitter or WordPress and I will gladly do so)

Making the best out of a bad situation

Going to make this blog entry short and sweet. Our water heater has gone onto the afterlife, or wherever water heaters go when they die…

This created additional motivation to get my ass to the gym, since my hygiene suffers if I don’t go and hit the showers.

During this unfortunate event something interesting happened, my mood improved. My added time at the gym actually made me happier. It forced me out of the house and into a more healthy environment. It really did not bother me that we had no running water at home.

I believe creating good luck can be a cumulative. For this reason I am going to experiment with finding opportunity in every experience, whether it is a request by someone for assistance, a turn of unfortunate events, or doubling down in a turn of fortunate events.

In regards to applying this to weight loss perhaps I will take people up on their offers to go to the gym with me. I often do go to the gym with someone, but there are times I like to be in my own little world, just me, the iron, and maybe the treadmill. Perhaps now I will take people up on their offer, even if I have already gone for the day.

I’m not sure, we will just have to see!

-Cyrus

Mental Strength is more important than Physical Endurane

In order to build muscle, increase flexibility, or over all stamina the same process must take place. Micro tears form in the muscle, tendons are stretch past comfort, and your lungs are deprived of oxygen; your muscles, tendons, and lungs, given proper rest and nutrients, will not only recover, but become stronger. This happens only if you push yourself beyond your physical limits. In other words, your mind must pick up the slack. It is a hard process to grasp at first, but it applies to almost anything in life.

By only trying do you have any chance of succeeding, and just like a new experience your muscles and organs ‘learn’ and adapt. You must push yourself beyond your comfort zone if you want to grow. If you want to become more fit, improve your diet, or do anything successfully you must have the mental strength to push past any discomfort. This article explains the science of mental toughness in great detail, far better than I can.

Muscle building is a great metaphor for life

Your brain should be treated like a muscle. You can strengthen your ability to focus, to resist temptation, and you do through exercises. In other words, it takes practice.  The best weight lifting exercises one can do, male or female, involve compound movements. These exercises are difficult for the unfit/novice weight lifters because they involve several joints and muscles. This requires some to do isolation movements/exercises in order to strengthen supporting muscles, in other words, break the problem down into smaller steps until you solve the bigger problem.

Sometimes you have to trick yourself into doing something

I have hip bursitis on my left side. When I was overweight, it was nearly impossible for me to sit or stand properly. Squats, one of the greatest compound movements a human could do for themselves was physically impossible at first, but over time the fear became more of an issue than my physical ability. I had to trick my mind into thinking It was physically okay for me to do an activity. There are several ways to do this for different activities, but in this case I did the activity by placing a chair that would allow me to go “parallel” (having your hamstrings and calves form a 90 degree angle). Eventually, I went past parallel, but whether you should go past parallel on a squat depends on your pelvic structure, but I digress…

This war you’re fighting is won and lost in the mind. The psychological war waged in your quest for self improvement cannot be won in one decisive battle. You must strategize, pick your fights carefully, know your limits and whether you are prepared to take on your next goal. You will become overly optimistic when you strategize, forethought can be a drug: check yourself before you wreck yourself! This is why almost all my post will involve topics involving the mind.

I will be posting a video blog tomorrow, take care!

-Cyrus